Tuesday, December 27, 2016

Ash Bar Top at the new Shea Theater

I designed and worked on the remodel of the Shea Theater in Turners Falls. I did lighting, art, Bar, and tables, and a woven drop ceiling. This blog covers  the bartop construction and tables that went with it. These are mostly taken in my Buckland shop. The project took place late 2015 through early 2016.


Thalo dye on end grain red oak



rought red oak section



Underside of bar section in Ash







two sections


printed full size patterns were used for very tight fitting built in bar sections


black stain on shaped underside of tables



fitting legs to tables


Max cutting oak sections for latter use


Front of Shea Theater with metalic paints


sanding the edges by hand to 220 grit








Jay Healy sawing Ash at Hall Tavern Farm

Acadia Once Again

My most recent series of collages are a continuation of one of my longest running series. The Acadia inspired pieces are the result of more than 10 years of visiting the park. In this corner of our country Acadia National Park is really it, as far as I am concerned. Fall, winter, summer, it has much to offer and revisit.



Not all imagery is from Acadia, Oregonian fields, Buckland Pumpkins, Ashfield leaf





Seaweed and Lichen featured here






Feathers, roots, butterfly wings, a leather vest, trees and a stone staircase 1000 ft high.




perfect fall timing in late October near 3 different parts of the park.



Friday, May 9, 2014

Wandering around Boston

One of my clients canceled a shoot at the last minute due to incomplete samples... so I ended up on my own, in Boston with camera in hand...The start of a new series perhaps? Hoping to return soon...


 




 




Monday, December 2, 2013

Repurposing Older Work


Baystate's Cancer Care Center was moving departments so an installation that I had done years prior needed to come down. These pieces were made to be built in so they had to be torn out, thankfully with their frames pretty much intact.


As they were, they seemed heavy, in color and in weight. So I cut the panels apart because I did not like how the canvas started behaving on the crease of the accordion fold. With an inch or so image gone between panels, I ended up with a picket fence kind of look. This was mostly a woodworking project. I had to figure out how to make exact cuts for the frame zig-zag, while keeping the whole thing as light as possible in feel, yet strong enough to stand up to the never ending stream of people coming through and touching out of curiosity.





 


These panels won't ever hang perfectly flat without their containing frame and I had to come to peace with that and also with the loose alignment and fabric feel. However, I am pleased that the hospital staff valued the work enough to suggest that we take the time and effort to repurpose it. This is infinitely better than letting it go, which happens so often. Now it will join other pieces of mine in the D'Ario Cancer Center, on the Springfield Baystate campus as well.















Saturday, August 17, 2013

Random Stuff

...........Just thought I would throw some images at you from the last few months with short explanations as to what they are. There is a minimum of photoshop manipulation in most of these. Some are right out of Lightroom. Things have been very disjointed this year and this imagery seems to reflect that, I guess. None of this material is for a client; shooting for myself here. If you want to see more on any of these sets please let me know.   pk




Bouldering in Acadia National Park, over, under, around and in between.
The grass up towards the top of the photo gives you a sense of scale.





I have been working on repairing my buildings outside.
One evening these two moths settled in very nicely right where I was doing some carpentry.
Not very shy!





While we were staying at some friends apartment in midtown New York,
I found this view around the corner from their balcony.
Holding the camera around the corner against the wall, I managed to get this shot.
This seemed to be a very New York scene with the Empire State and such a typical roofscape.







Here I was shooting outdoors with plants sandwiched between two sheets of plastic to flatten them. 
This allowed me to keep everything in focus.
There are some reflections off the plastic, but I found it worked well enough. 
These were shot as collage material.






Kristin is the model, Tracey helped with this shoot. Lots of props, and Dianne's lace.
The antlers (projected slide) were borrowed from a neighbor hunter.
Things finally started to get interesting many hours into a marathon shoot.






When the kids were small we made some blocks for them (for me?).
I got them out, cleaned them up, and did some building on a draped black cloth. 
They were lit by all the flashlights I could find in the house and studio.



Wednesday, April 17, 2013

Part of the Process



   This week I have returned to painting. It feels good. It's been a while. These images are tighter than usual. They are inspired by a small gem of an oil painting at the Wadsworth Athenium in Hartford. Not directly from Klee but indirectly I am sure.My image making process requires fresh painted backgrounds just as it requires new photographs from my travels. Inspiration comes and we shift gears.
In this blog, I am focusing on a part of the picture making process that I have not shown before, starting with the collage techniques I have been using since long before digital possibilities opened up. It begins with the unforgiving world of moving real paint around and ends up with the infinitely adjustable world of photoshop.Over the years, I’ve accumulated a vast library of these background paintings, as I call them. They become textural layers or stand alone sections within the finished digital collages. This library of painted imagery goes way back. It started in 2000, after returning from a trip to Japan, making digital collages from photos taken while traveling. These were made with an early Mac laptop and Fuji Pro digital camera. Seems like ancient history.